February 2006

Abnormal aspect of the spinal cord

Clinical Info

Bilateral paralysis of the lower extremities

Ultrasound Images & Clips

Newborn female, Bilateral paralysis of the lower extremities

Longitudinal image of an abnormal ending spinal cord (conus) in an abnormal position and a short cauda. There is also an abnormal aspect of the sacrum.
Longitudinal image of an abnormal ending spinal cord (conus) in an abnormal position and a short cauda. There is also an abnormal aspect of the sacrum.
Detail of the conus (arrow) with a blunt distal end in a slightly dorsal position (longitudinal view).
Detail of the conus (arrow) with a blunt distal end in a slightly dorsal position (longitudinal view).
Detail of the short cauda (longitudinal view).
Detail of the short cauda (longitudinal view).
Longitudinal view of the normal distal spinal cord (arrows) and cauda for comparison.
Longitudinal view of the normal distal spinal cord (arrows) and cauda for comparison.
Longitudinal view of the abnormal distal spinal cord (arrow).
Longitudinal view of the abnormal distal spinal cord (arrow).
AP X ray of the lumbar spine and pelvis showing an abnormal development of the lower lumbar spine and sacral bones and an under developed narrow pelvis.
AP X ray of the lumbar spine and pelvis showing an abnormal development of the lower lumbar spine and sacral bones and an under developed narrow pelvis.
Lateral X ray of the lumbar spine showing an abnormal development of the lower lumbar spine and sacral bones.
Lateral X ray of the lumbar spine showing an abnormal development of the lower lumbar spine and sacral bones.

Conclusion

Diagnosis: Caudal regression syndrome. The mother of the child was a diabetic. Her diabetes was difficult to regulate during her pregnancy. Caudal regression syndrome is seen more often in cases of diabetes.


Details

  • Sex: Female

Created with

  • Hitachi Ultrasound System