March 2019

Three incidental found liver lesions one hypoechoic one nearly isoechoic and one hyperechoic. Can it be identical lesions in all three patients?

Clinical Info

Three patients with incidental found liver lesions examined for SONOZORG a primary care ultrasound facility. The lesions look very different from hypoechoic to hyperechoic. Can it be the same type of lesion in all three patients?

Ultrasound Images & Clips

Incidental found liver lesions

Lesion one is hypoechoic
Lesion one is hypoechoic
Another image of the same lesion
Another image of the same lesion
Another image of the same lesion
Another image of the same lesion
The lesion does not show flow on color doppler
The lesion does not show flow on color doppler
Image of the liver. There is a fatty liver and there are gallstones
Image of the liver. There is a fatty liver and there are gallstones
This is the lesion of the second patient that is nearly isoechoic
This is the lesion of the second patient that is nearly isoechoic
Another image of the same lesion
Another image of the same lesion
This lesion also doesn't show much flow
This lesion also doesn't show much flow
This is the third patient. The lesion is hyperechoic
This is the third patient. The lesion is hyperechoic
Another image of the lesion
Another image of the lesion
Again the lesion doesn't show flow
Again the lesion doesn't show flow

Conclusion

All the lesions proved to be haemangiomas. If you look a the echogenicity of the liver parenchyma you will notice that the first patient has a fatty liver. The last patient has a very normal liver parenchyma.
Hemangiomas usually are hyperechoic but they can be hypoechoic or have a mixed density. Contrast ultrasound or a CT scan with contrast usually will confirm the nature of the lesion


Details

  • Body part: Liver

Created with

  • Hitachi Ultrasound System